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A Review of Islam: What the West Needs to Know PDF Print E-mail
News - Theology
Written by Tim Black   
Wednesday, 21 July 2010 14:51
If you have time for two movie nights in a row, you might want to watch the following two (long) videos.

A friend forwarded this video to me, which I found a very interesting, even convincing presentation of the threat posed to the West by radical Islam:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-871902797772997781#

Then I watched this second video, which responds to many of the points made in the first video from a peaceful Islamic perspective:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dxh3Fj-qe1k&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTuby5Y9wQE&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uRVAMd0gR3g&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AixgiXpAFTY&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eMEYvriUbSM&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CMCI9TjeFGk&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FBcvuV9ewAc&feature=related

It appears to me that BOTH forms of Islam - radical and peaceful - exist.  After watching the second video, I was reminded of a question a brother asked me at GA:  Is God a theonomist?  He wanted me to answer "Yes."  But I answered "No."  Theonomists are ungodly, when in regard to the death penalties in the OT, they are unwilling to require human civil courts to maintain the principle of "life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth." (Ex. 21:24; Lev. 24:20; Deut. 19:21)  That principle, called the Lex Talionis (law of the tooth), God made universally binding on all men in the covenant with Noah in Gen. 9:6, therefore it is more foundational than God's temporary delegation to human courts under Moses of His divine court's right to punish sins less than murder with death, which delegation was ended when God removed the Davidic monarchy by sending His people into exile.  If theonomists ruled our civil courts, I believe the West would have some of the same opposition to theonomy which it has to Shariah law.

I find it more compelling to consider not whether Islam is violent (1st video says "yes"), or unjust (2nd video says "no"), but whether it has any true mercy.  Islam claims "Allah is merciful," but by denying Christ is the atoning sacrifice for our sins, has no way for Allah's mercy to be extended to man and retain any semblance of justice--Allah's supposed mercy is arbitrary and capricious, perhaps promised to some men in general but not guaranteed to particular men in particular on the basis of an atonement for their particular sins that satisfies Allah's justice.

The good news that Christianity offers is that "Christ died for our sins" (1 Cor. 15:3)--not for the sins of every man in general, but for the sins of the elect--those particular people whom God chooses to save.  This is the 3rd of the 5 Points of Calvinism, called "Limited Atonement," or "Particular Redemption."  It is just, because our sins are truly paid for in the atonement, AND because that payment is truly applied to the accounts of those particular people for whom Christ died, so that Christ who said "I lay down my life for the sheep" (John 10:15) can also say "All that the Father gives me will come to me, and whoever comes to me I will never cast out" (John 6:37), and "they will never perish, and no one will snatch them out of my hand" (John 10:29).  Through the work of Jesus Christ, God is both just and merciful--"just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus."  But Allah is not merciful, because he has no way of justly paying the penalty our sins deserve, and so has no payment to apply to our accounts.  In Islam, man must pay for his own sins, and attempt to cancel out his evil deeds by doing enough good deeds, as the second video also makes clear--Allah loves the one who is righteous.  But Christians must admit what Muslims will not--"None is righteous, no, not one...all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God." (Rom. 3:10, 23)  We sinners cannot make ourselves righteous by our own works, as Islam expects us to do.  Because we have sinned.  Praise God for giving us a Savior, who saves us from our sin!

So I don't think the first video's possible implication that the West must defend Christianity with the sword is really the right solution.  Rather, Christianity must save the East and West with the gospel of salvation through faith in Jesus Christ.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 21 July 2010 16:17
 
Worship Prep Using a Spreadsheet of Trinity Hymnal Hymns PDF Print E-mail
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News - Theology
Written by Tim Black   
Wednesday, 21 July 2010 14:26

For my own quick reference while planning worship services, I combined the table of hymn numbers, titles, authors, composers, tunes, meters, and scripture references publicly available on the OPC website with this page's list of which hymns have guitar chords in the Trinity Hymnal into a Google spreadsheet and thought I'd share it with you in case you would find it useful.  So here it is:  Trinity Hymnal Hymn Data Spreadsheet.

I use that spreadsheet to track whether a hymn is familiar to my congregation, and when we last sang it, and expect other pastors could benefit from using the spreadsheet that way too.  I also think the spreadsheet could help people in the future to find guitar chords for the Psalms in the Trinity Psalter, if I could find an appropriate way to add the Psalm numbers into the spreadsheet.

I should point out that my spreadsheet's list of which hymns have guitar chords is LONGER than the list compiled at http://www.pontificationadnauseam.com/?p=65, because I have written guitar chords into my hymnal for some hymns which were not originally printed in the Trinity Hymnal with guitar chords, and have updated my spreadsheet to match my hymnal.  So if you or someone else wants to use this spreadsheet, I recommend you copy-and-paste it into a new Google spreadsheet of your own, then (sort by the guitar chords column and) delete the marks indicating chords are printed for those hymns which are not listed on http://www.pontificationadnauseam.com/?p=65.

You might want to know several other ways I use this spreadsheet.  Basically, I use the spreadsheet's ability to sort all the data by a particular column to serve the same purpose as the multiple indexes in the back of the Trinity Hymnal.

1.  We are using our choir to teach our congregation new songs from the hymnal.  So to find musically beautiful hymns for our choir to sing, I sorted by composer, looked for classical composers since their harmonies are (arguably) likely to be more beautiful, then picked out several that are unfamiliar to our congregation.

2.  For the same purpose with the choir, to find songs with unfamiliar words but familiar tunes, I sorted by tune name and then looked at the "Familiar" column.

3.  When I'm in a hurry to find hymns I can play on the guitar and whose words are appropriate for a particular worship service, I sort by the "Guitar" column to get a short list of hymns with chords.

4.  Though I normally use the printed hymnal for this purpose (and though I think maybe this spreadsheet's list of scripture references contains some errors), you could sort by scripture reference and see immediately what the titles of the corresponding hymns are--the printed hymnal lists only the hymns' numbers, not their titles, so using the spreadsheet could save time.

5.  If you find that a hymn's words would be appropriate for a particular worship service, but the tune is unfamiliar or otherwise undesirable, you can sort by the "Meter" column, find the hymn whose words you like, and find the music for a different tune which might work with those words.

6.  If you want to teach about a particular author's life as a background behind a particular hymn, it can be useful to sort by "Author" to easily find which hymns he wrote.

7.  As I mentioned, I keep a running record of which hymns are familiar to my congregation, and when we last sang each hymn.  This helps me avoid having us sing too many unfamiliar hymns in one service, which can be discouraging to members, and it helps me avoid having us sing the same hymn too frequently.  To use the spreadsheet this way, typically I find a hymn in the hymnal which I think would be appropriate for a service, then hit CTRL-F to bring up a search dialog, then I search for the hymn number in question to see how recently we sang it and whether it is familiar.

8.  Though normally I have no need to do so, if I want to find a hymn by its title, I can sort or search by title.

9.  Of course, after sorting the hymns into a strange order, you can sort by hymn number to put them back in their original order as found in the Trinity Hymnal.

The only way to gain ALL of this functionality is for a person to copy the data into their own spreadsheet file, so they can have their own personal records of whether a hymn is familiar and when it was last sung.  If you don't need that record, the other sorting functionality is already provided here http://opc.org/books/THrev/ (that page is linked to by the Wikipedia page on the Trinity Hymnal).

One last note:  My reason for playing the guitar is not primarily to add another instrument, variety, or a popular style to the service, though I'm not necessarily opposed to those things, and am in favor of members using their musical gifts to help accompany congregational singing.  Rather, I play the guitar in our service to help fill in for when our (two) pianists are unavailable; because one of them is in her 80's I feel obligated to be able to help with the accompaniment.  This means sometimes I provide ALL the accompaniment, or we may sing a capella (which isn't necessarily bad.)  But in the process I've discovered the Trinity Hymnal has no chords for several songs which are commonly used in every service--the doxology, Gloria Patri, etc.  So I've found and made up chords for those songs.  If there is ever a new edition to the Trinity Hymnal, I recommend including guitar chords for songs which are commonly used in our churches' services, not to lower the quality of our services' accompaniment, but to enable some of our services--and perhaps even churches--to have accompaniment. To ameliorate this problem for myself and guitarists who cannot read music, I've begun posting the chords that are missing from the Trinity Hymnal, and video demos of how to play each hymn on the guitar, for others to use at Trinity Hymnal - Guitar chords & demo videos.

Last Updated on Friday, 07 September 2012 20:53
 
Why did Jesus say "tell no one" the gospel? PDF Print E-mail
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News - Theology
Written by Tim Black   
Thursday, 15 April 2010 08:39

On the OPC email discussion list, Dean asked,

In Mark 5:19 Jesus says, "Go home to your friends, and tell them what great things the Lord has done for you, and how He has had compassion on you." The man returns to Decapolis, but toward the end of Mark 7 when Jesus visits Decapolis and performs a miracle "He commanded them that they should tell no one."

Why the two different instructions from Jesus for the same geographic region?

Many Reformed commentaries (see John Calvin, Matthew Henry) give the following good explanation of the several places where Jesus told people not to tell anyone about Him and His works, which is also known as the "Messianic secret":  it was not yet the time for Christ to be delivered over to the hands of sinful men to be crucified, and then to be raised from the dead and exalted to the right hand of God the Father.  But there was a turning point when Christ said "The hour has come for the Son of Man to be glorified" (John 12:23), when Christ no longer hid His purpose to reign as king from full view in the eyes of the public and of the government:  the Triumphal Entry, John 12:12-19.

Before the Triumphal Entry, Jesus did tell some to proclaim the gospel of faith in Christ to which His miracles bore witness, but He limited that proclamation's content, frequency, and extent, until the proper time when He commanded us to go into all the world, preach the gospel, make disciples of all nations, baptizing and teaching them to obey everything He commanded.  That proper time was after His resurrection, and particularly, after the Holy Spirit was poured out at Pentecost.

During His earthly ministry, Jesus trained His disciples to proclaim the gospel, but He did so in stages, in a limited manner, during the time of His humiliation, and we must learn our gospel proclamation today from that training.  But now, during the time of His exaltation, He commands us to go forth and proclaim the gospel as He has trained us to do.  This is how these two stages of Christ's ministry--humiliation and exaltation--and these two sets of instructions--"tell them" and "tell no one"--are connected in regard to their impact on our gospel proclamation today.

 
Matt. 16:21-28 - Take Up Your Cross PDF Print E-mail
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News - Sermons
Written by Tim Black   
Sunday, 14 March 2010 10:45
  1. Introduction

    1. The Authority of the Kingdom

      1. There is a golden thread woven throughout Matthew 14-18 which I have only mentioned at a few key junctures, but which is also what I've titled the sermon series through these chapters, and now it is appropriate to bring that thread fully into view. The golden thread which is the theme of these chapters is the authority of Christ's kingdom. Jesus' miracles established His authority so His disciples recognized it, confessing He was the Christ, the Anointed, God's chosen Savior, our Prophet, Priest, and King. He has authority to save His people, and He will build His church, so we must join His church by confessing Christ as our Savior as Peter did in the immediately preceding passage. Not only does Christ have authority, but He exercises it through the officers and members of His church. He promised to give His disciples the authority of the Keys of the Kingdom.

      2. How should they exercise this authority in Christ's kingdom? Peter learned the lesson of this passage well, when he instructed elders to be "not domineering over those in your charge, but being examples to the flock." (1 Pet. 5:3) Peter gave that instruction to elders, but this passage is not only for elders. The whole rest of 1 Peter's instructions to the general members of Christ's church is nothing more than the application of what Christ taught him here in Matthew 16.

    2. Outline. What Christ would have us do today can be boiled down to this: if you would follow Him, in vv. 21-23, set your mind on the things of God, and in vv. 24-28, take up your cross.

      1. Set Your Mind on the Things of God vv. 21-23

        1. What Are The Things of God? v. 21

        2. What Are The Things of Man? v. 22

        3. Set Your Mind on the Things of God v. 23

      2. Take Up Your Cross vv. 24-28

        1. The Challenge v. 24

        2. The Tradeoff vv. 25-26

        3. The Warning v. 27

        4. The Encouragement v. 28

Last Updated on Monday, 15 March 2010 15:11
 
3 Simple Rules that Will Make You A 'Superstar' Developer PDF Print E-mail
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News - Web Development
Written by Tim Black   
Monday, 01 February 2010 14:23

This is hilarious:

http://coderoom.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/3-simple-rules-that-will-make-you-a-superstar-developer

Last Updated on Monday, 01 February 2010 14:28
 
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